*NEW – Vintage Hand-Sewn WALL STREETER Shoe Co., GOLF Norwegian, Circa 1960: 45D-46C

440.00

SOLD - Österreich
  • Wall Streeter
    Since 1912
    4-Eyelet Split Toe, Hand Raised Golf Norwegian
    Euro 440

    James E. Wall (1884-1959) and Edward Streeter put their names together in 1912 to manufacture shoes in North Adams, Massachusetts, not unaware of the automatic association of the “Wall-Streeter” brand name with New York’s well-dressed financial district. The company had 164 employees by 1920, making 2,000 shoes a day. By 1925, Wall became the sole owner of the firm.

    The Great Depression took its toll on the American shoe industry but the Wall-Streeter Co. persevered and during World War II, the Wall firm turned out 1,000 pair of Army shoes a day.

    In 1962, the firm moved its manufacture of hand-sewn shoes to 10,000 square feet of the former Windsor Print Works, while its main plant remained on Union Street.

    In 1973, facing withering off-shore competition, Robert E. Wall announced the closing of the business and the sale of the North Adams plant to Florsheim, signaling the end of 60 plus years of Wall Streeter’s operation.

    The superb golf shoes shown here are remarkable, not only for being the Norwegians, uncommon among Golf shoes,  for the extraordinary attention to detail, the amount of hand work that has gone into their making, the hand-raised apron and hand-sewn soles. Hand sewn soles had long ago been rendered obsolete by the Goodyear machine, relegated to the bespoke trade, but here they are in a beautifully made ready-to-wear shoe. The leather too is extraordinary, reminding one more of luggage grade leather than of shoe leather, selected, no doubt, for its durability under the challenging outdoor and off-road conditions imposed by golf.

    Size: these are equally suited for an 11.5D or 12C US foot. (45D-46C Continental size)


    Shoe Condition:

    New, never worn. Sold without trees

Article Number: 0021BR-1 Category:

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