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NEW - NETTLETON for Barrie Ltd., Full Brogue Derby, Circa 1980: 42D

[English below]                                                                        Artikelnummer: 27557BL

Nettleton
für
Barrie Ltd.
Full Wing-Tip Derby Brogue
Circa 1980
Euro 480
Nettleton, einer der einst grossen amerikanischen Schuhmacher, wurde 1879 in Syracuse, New York gegründet und blieb für fast genau 100 Jahre in Betrieb. Die Fabrik wurde in den 80ern in Apartments und Räume für Grosshandel umgewandelt. Nettleton hat exzellente Qualitäts-Schuhe gearbeitet, denen von Hanover und Florsheim durchaus ähnlich. Nettleton ist ebenfalls bekannt dafür, dass die Firma den 1. Loafer weltweit patentiert bekam! Unter ihren Kunden fanden sich Charles Lindbergh, General “Black Jack” Pershing und die Wright Brüder; eine wichtige und einflussreiche Firma in der Geschichte amerikanischer Schuhmacherkunst.
Dieses antike Paar von Nettleton ist aus Full-Grain-Kalbsleder gearbeitet, gefüttert mit feinem Glove-Leather“, rahmengenäht, plus “split reverse welt” (Sturm-Welt) (Bild #11), und einer eichen-gegerbten Ledersohle. Dies ist ein sehr feiner und äusserst luxuriöser Schuh, absolut schlicht im Design. Insgesamt ein glamouröses Stück, das nicht so bald wiederzusehen sein wird. Ein idealer Schuh für "Town or Country".   
Zustand: Neu und ungetragen. 
Deutsche Grösse: 42D.... (US 9D)….(UK 8E), für den mittel-breiten Fuss.
Nettleton
marketed by the retailer
Barrie Ltd.
Full Wing-Tip Derby Brogue
Circa 1980
Euro 480
Nettleton, one of the great erstwhile American Shoemakers, was founded in 1879 in Syracuse, New York and remained in existence for almost exactly 100 years. The factory was converted to apartments and retail space in the 1980s. They produced an excellent quality shoe, similar to those of Hanover and Florsheim, and they are remembered for having patented the first loafer in the world! Their clients included Charles Lindbergh, General “Black Jack” Pershing, and the Wright Brothers; they were an important firm in the history of the American shoemaker.
It is sad to note that for many years the old firm of Nettleton was bankrupted out of existence, their good name sold to marketing interests to adorn contemptibly plebian product made off shore. But good news is on the way; an inspired group of seasoned shoe manufacturing professionals has taken over the remnants of the old Nettleton firm and is producing a fine custom range of traditional models under this grand old name. More information on this presently.
This vintage Full Brogue by Nettleton is far superior in build and finish than most shoes on the market today. This is an indestructible shoe with additional “split reverse welt” (Pic.#11), oak-tanned double sole and hand-set cordwainer heel with cleat. Notice, please, the hand-sewn welt. The build quality competes with Florsheim’s best and positively superior to almost any ready-made shoe today, including J. Lobb and E. Green…and more than a few custom-made shoes as well.
Condition: New and unworn.  
 
And if I may indulge in a little nostalgia; Barrie Ltd., on York Street in New Haven, a Yale institution since 1934, closed its doors in October 2004. For some 70 years Barrie presented an impressive array of fine English shoe made to their own specifications. Their clientele of Yale students, graduates and faculty supported this family run business through three generations of the Barrie family until recently when Barrie Ltd. was forced out by Yale University’s Real Estate Department’s lease demands. Yale had been buying such commercial buildings on Chapel, Broadway and York Streets as became available, including the building in which Barrie Ltd was housed.
To be fair, much of the gentrification of Chapel Street in the last decade has been the result of Yale attracting “national” businesses. Even the old Barrie location is now occupied by a successor shoe business of quality. Still, for those of us who go a few years farther back in memory –rather say decades- the once noble decay of the area surrounding campus will be missed. As the Boarders, Bennetons and Burger Kings proliferate, as the area around campus comes to ever more resemble a mall, as quality and products migrate to some common denominator of market mediocrity, as shopping streets begin to be indistinguishable from one other, and as the wonderful disorder and diversity of former times is swept away with the passing of family owned business, to what will future generations of students turn, to avoid the rising tide of uniformity?
Still, Barrie Ltd., their excellent English shoes, their free shoe shines for old clients, and the Barrie family manning the store for all those years will be remembered by many an old boy. On a Reunion Weekend, you were as likely to run into an old classmate in the Barrie’s shop as on campus.
One old Yale graduate, David Chambers, writing about Barrie Ltd. and the old days remarked “When we were at Yale as students, we looked good (remember those coats and ties?) and the streets looked a bit shabby. Now the streets look good (all those "national" stores) and the students look shabby.” Quite right, David, quite right.  
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